Tag darkfall

Does Freedom Need To Come With Such A Price?

Darkfall startup

Get if off! Get it off! Get it...oh, that's the UI.

I decided to take up Aventurine on their $1 for 7 days offer and created a Darkfall account for the US server. After all, I have wanted to give that game a try for a long time and it seemed like a good way of doing it without having to pony up the ridiculous amount of money they charge for it.

Most Darkfall-fans often point out that you will hate the game at first, because the UI and controls are so different from other MMOs. I would like to second that. The UI and controls are not only bad, they are both a piece of stinking dung. They are completely and utterly worthless, like they have been created for the sole purpose of driving new players insane by just being stupid.

I haven’t played much more than one hour of Darkfall in total, rerolling three times because my character looked too silly when I finally got in the game. The one I have now looks pretty cool, a wolf-man pirate ready for some sandbox action. But the game is such a hassle to play, there’s nothing intuitive about it at all. Fighting goblins, looting, harvesting…all a pain to everything my gamer self has learned about design over the course of my gaming career.

I can’t help feeling that the UI is a prototype, that it was built this way to get the game up and running so it could be shown to investors. Then Aventurine ran out of money and didn’t have time to replace it, instead the game kept being designed around that mess. Darkfall-fans, including SynCaine, often say that it is like that for design reasons. I don’t buy it. If it is, it’s at least not good design.

UI setup

My UI after fiddling around with for a while.

While I will keep playing Darkfall for a bit, for despite the glaring flaws of the new player experience and the insane babble in the chat channels the world is quite inviting, I was reminded of my first time in EVE. Three years ago, EVE Online was hardly a very nice place to start out in. The introduction to the game was, just like in Darkfall, a mess. But the cluster was inviting enough for me to hang around, and slowly the designers at CCP have created a better way for new players to get a feel for its potential.

Perhaps Darkfall will go down the same route, perhaps with future patches or expansions Aventurine can dig deep into their own designs and rethink certain aspects of their game. Because seriously, just because it is a full PVP, full loot, warfare-focused MMO doesn’t mean that it has to be designed in a way that would give most intelligent people a headache (I am sure Darkfall has many intelligent players, they just seem to stay away from the chat channels – like in most MMOs, come to think of it…). Or does it? Ryzom can also be quite hard for people to learn. Do “sandbox” and “convoluted controls and game mechanics” go hand in hand?  Do you think that a MMO with mechanics similar to World of Warcraft or Allods Online ever could be the foundation of a good sandbox game?

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Loving The Sandbox, Missing The Fantasy

EVE Online

I pwn noobs in space.

I do love EVE Online, even if some online drama and paranoia over the last week or so made me wonder if I really have the energy to move to 0.0 right now. Application has been processed, roles dropped, assets liquidated and jump clones prepped (more or less) but seeing the true paranoid face of EVE’s political alliances and corps is putting me off.

If I do the move I will end up in one of the most volatile areas of the cluster as well, straight into a war that will probably spiral out of control at some point. With Against All Authorities/U’K moving in on CVA-space in the south (death to the slavers!), Goonswarm losing their territories in Delve (and, well, the alliance itself) and Mostly Harmless fighting ev0ke in the north, the whole stage is set for all out war in more or less all of 0.0 space. It could turn out to be very interesting, and in some ways I want to get in there and get my hands dirty in case the whole madhouse starts crashing down. Then again, nothing might happen. I’m not that updated on the politics as I want to be.

For the record: Against All Authorities is the coolest alliance name in EVE. And no, I have not applied for membership with them.

Anyway, while the wonderful sandbox that is EVE Online is calling to me, I also miss fantasy. Yes, we have way too many fantasy MMOs to choose from, but still I miss it. Dwarves and elves and swords and stuff. I miss Lord of the Rings Online, which I haven’t played in a while. Between EVE, Global Agenda and Star Trek Online, I have enough sci-fi to last me a long time. I want a classic fantasy epic adventure! And no, I do not want World of Warcraft!

Darkfall

I pwn fantasy noobs.

So I’m looking at Darkfall…not to join up with a large guild/alliance, but perhaps settle down in a more tranquil area while the wars rage around me. You can only listen to Beu and SynCaine for that long before you want to give it a try. It also seems like Aventurine have done a lot of work when it comes to ambient things like monster and creature AI.

Of course, guild names like “No daddy not again” and “Genital Asphyxiation” make me dread the community (even though the latter is kinda fun). And yeah, the whole PvP forum warrior gang that seems to infest the game. Imagine, a sandbox fantasy PvP game without the nutcases. What an utopia that would be.

So, anyone with me? Let’s all move to Darkfall, be nice noobs, find ourselves a calm area of the world (ha!) and just…fish. And cry if someone starts ganking us. I practiced in EVE a few days ago, when a Mega had my Brutix as a snack in a low-sec exploration site.

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Leaving The Game Is Not Always Weakness

First of all, I love hearing expressions like “the weak must be culled” when related to a MMO. It makes my MMO-loving self feel all warm and fuzzy inside, like the virtual worlds that we inhabit are actually becoming increasingly real. And blood-thirsty. Hardcore stuff, making even the elitist jerks seem humble (ever read any of their FAQs? That’s e-peen stroking right there.).

It’s made up social Darwinism in a virtual world, where rules are meant to be broken. It’s not about aim-botting in a first person shooter, it’s about exploiting other people’s trust and game mechanics to ruin the game for them.

While I agree that bank robbing in any game could be a legit way of playing the game, just like emptying out a corp’s hangars in EVE has been for a long time, I don’t believe there is anything admirable about doing it the way that this Darwoth obviously did. It might make for some hilarious Internet reading, we all love that, but these are the kind of players I don’t want in my game. Not because they rob guilds, but because they are being smug idiots while doing it.

Tiresome, smug idiots. Their “culling of the weak” is more or less ganking people, messing them over. If you leave a game after having been exploited by an idiot like that, probably because months of work was lost because some jackass decided to have some fun followed by a realization what kind of community your game has, I do not blame you. You’re not weak, you’re just fed up. Withdraw your credit card, show both the community and the devs that you do not wish to be affiliated with them – be it Aventurine, CCP, Blizzard…

Social engineering, infiltrating a corp/guild to get to their bank, moving from the ground up until you have access to said bank/hangars…that’s a different thing. That’s infiltration. It’s close to just being a smug idiot, of course, but it’s a different beast. Guiding Hand Social Club didn’t make a use of blaming naming violations to get to Ubiqua Seraph’s CEO, they infiltrated the corp for a long time before they struck. They gave the grieved party a chance to react, a chance to discover what was going on. That’s playing a game, no matter how meta it is.

“Culling the weak”? Let’s not give Dawoth any more credit than he truly deserves, lets not even give Darkfall credit it doesn’t deserve for something an idiot did (which really could have happened in any MMO, more or less). Sometimes I feel like giving DF a go, just to play as “weak” as possible, yet keep going, keep enjoying myself. Being that awful nub the Forumfall community seems to be so afraid of.

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The Enemy Of My Enemy Is My Best Developer Friend!

Scott Jennings, aka Lum the Mad, has posted a fun blog entry over at MMORPG.com, with the oh so controversial title How PvP Can Break Your Game. Scott is a great writer and it’s always fun to read his insights into MMO-making. Syncaine, of course, took offense because Scott mentioned Darkfall, and made some stuff up and Tobold took offense that Syncaine took offense and dug up some old arguments that he probably doesn’t believe himself so he could bash Darkfall (again). All very funny, and quite sad at the same time.

No matter, that’s not really the point here – the point is the description of the forum warriors in Scott’s post. For many forum posters on MMO forums, it seems like the developers are the great enemy. They are the evil that plagues their game, shifting game balance and nerfing classes left to right. We see it all over the place, visit any MMO’s official forums and you’ll find them. Often, the subject line is in caps, so you don’t have to look very hard for the posts I’m talking about.

Nerfed!

Arena is doing what now? Where did my class go?

I agree that the developer can be the great enemy, especially when they bring a huge change to a game that you’ve played for ages. When World of Warcraft introduced the arena, and Blizzard tried to make an e-sport of a game where PvP was an afterthought, well…for me, and many like me, the developers were the enemy. They were ruining our home, our world, because of a small, small fraction of their player base.

But sometimes, especially if you’re a player in a smaller MMO, the developers are not your enemy. Usually, they are trying their best to fix a game in order for the game to stay afloat. Sometimes, they should be seen as your buddy, you should try to work with them instead of against them. Sometimes, you should just play nice, thank them for the stuff they are actually able to deliver, and either thank them for their time and leave or hang around and see what happens.

It’s pretty rampant in the Star Wars Galaxies forums, where a thread about the upcoming (and pretty major and cool) Galactic Civil War-update turns into a flamewar about how relevant Light Side Jedis are in PvP. Instead of understanding that the game is actually struggling, with the executives (that don’t care about your petty abilities or PvP survivability) breathing down the devs’ all too exposed necks, and trying to keep the criticism valid and creative, the forums warriors’ arguments tend all to degenerate into “yur idiots lol”. Seriously, it has to stop.

Attack!

Proud Vanguard forum warriors stand united against this horrible...oh, they are only trying to help? What?

What got my blood flowing this time was this thread on the Vanguard forums, as pointed my way by (the always amazing) Dusty. In it, Silius tries to explain to the players that the dev team is low on resources and that they are trying to do as much as possible with the little they have – which includes scrapping some stuff in order to create a better game in the long run. It’s one of the most honest dev posts I’ve seen on a forum in a long time and it’s not every day a dev comes out and says “look, we’re short on cash, please have patience”.

The bitching starts with the first comment. Already on the first page, people start talking about SOE shutting the game down.

This is really not the time to paint the developer, who actually comes out and says more or less exactly what is going on behind the scenes (something many players ask for in most MMOs), as the enemy. It’s the time to pat him on the back, tell him how much you appreciate the game and that you understand that you don’t have all the data, all the numbers, all the logs, all the knowledge. It’s the time to either come up with some creative criticism, enjoy what is on offer or leave the game behind.

It is not a good time for insults. That developer, who probably had to go head to head with the PR-apartment for evening mentioning stuff like having “tried to do more with what [they] have and it has not always panned out”, has just done you a huge favor. But as a forum warrior and a pro-complainer, I suppose it is hard to see it that way.

It makes me sad, to be honest. I feel for the Vanguard devs. They are working on a gem of a game with one of the coolest crafting systems in the industry and an alternative advancement system that at least tried to do something new (diplomacy). They are probably under a lot of pressure, knowing full and well that if they don’t turn the game around, it will go the way of Matrix Online.

And that means that perhaps that special feature that you were looking forward to will get scrapped. Sorry, the new AA system won’t be available soon. Sorry, no new 24 man raids (any idea how hard raids are to design, not to mention code?) until enough bugs have been fixed and new content is in. Sorry.

I feel with you, Silius. A lot of us do. We’re your buddies! A lot of people that are only playing the game and not complaining on the forums love Vanguard. Keep up the good work, keep making hard decisions for the good of the game’s future. We love you for it.

Sometimes, the best thing to do is to hug people.

/hug

Update: Beau, of Spouse Aggro, places the blame for Vanguard’s struggle on the community.

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Which virtual world to visit this summer?

Summer is coming. Summer means gaming. So does the rest of the year, but still. Which means I need a summer MMO to keep myself busy.

I really did try to give EverQuest II another chance, but after a brief session yesterday I decided to call it quits again. I do enjoy the game on certain levels, the gameplay is fairly solid and the graphics aren’t all that bad (except the character design, which I’m not a big fan of), but I am amazed at how the zoning always gets to me. It really shouldn’t be that big a deal, but I can’t help having to stretch my imagination too far every time I zone – in my head, The Baubleshire and the Forest Ruins aren’t connected in any way, despite the fact that they are right next to each other. The zoning between them completely breaks my immersion, which annoys me to the degree that I have a hard time enjoying the rest of the EQII-experience.

For a weak moment I was considering resubbing to Age of Conan, despite what some people seem to think about Funcom’s latest event screw up, but then I remembered that if there’s one game that has a lot of zoning, it’s AoC. I also did some reading on the official AoC forums and seeing references to the amount of instances of a given zone up at one time, I really decided to skip it. If there is one thing that gets me more than zoning it’s instancing of an open zone (dungeons are exceptions). I even prefer more servers with less people on them than multiple instances of a zone on one server. Just the thought of it makes my skin crawl. It’s a horrible, bad and cheap design solution.

So where does that leave me? Rappelz still won’t co-operate, which really bugs me. A clean install is coming up and some manual patching on top of that should solve my issues, even though it’s really damn annoying that I have to do that just to get the thing running. Champions Online has been delayed until September, but to be honest I wasn’t all that impressed with the press beta. Jumpgate Evolution has been delayed as well, but considering what a train wreck of a MMO NetDevil’s old Auto Assault was, why do I even care to begin with? I’m not very impressed with the ship design and I know I will always expect space MMOs that only has a ship as your avatar to be as cut-throat as EVE Online. Dog fights are cool and all, but I still love the rush of EVE’s PvP fights.

Darkfall? The €42 price tag says “no”. I would love to give it a try, but I can’t for the life of me see myself paying that much money for it. It also seems like the European, and only, server is already populated and entrenched by now. I might consider it if they open up the NA-1 server in June and allow people to transfer off from EU-1, but I would prefer to see a brand new server opening up in Europe instead. Even though the empires are already established in EVE Online, you still have Empire space to keep you safe and cuddly until you dare to leave for low- or null-sec. I’m not 100% sure, since I’ve not tried DF myself, but it seems like it would be harder to start up a brand new, small sized guild compared to getting a corp up and running in EVE.

So, my eyes have once again fallen on Vanguard. There might not be any large-scale politics to get involved in, but it has a massive and epic world filled with places to see and explore. I really liked it when I played it, but since raiding in World of Warcraft got the better of me I cancelled my sub ages ago. I haven’t seen the Isle of Dawn (except the very first parts), I never got past level 20 and since diplomacy has seen a bit of a revamp since I left I’m really aching to see what they’ve done with those quest chains (I really liked diplomacy). I’ve been a bit worried (and still am, in a way) that SOE would leave the game to rot, but the Halls of the Pantheon update was just applied to the live servers which means the devs are keeping themselves busy.

As it stands right now, it’s Vanguard vs a deeper commitment to EVE Online. I love EVE, I always have, always will. But it plays completely different than other MMOs, at least for me. It’s about 10 days until I finished Small Railgun Spec V, then we’ll see if EVE will be my summer MMO. Until then, I think I’ll resub to Vanguard and give Isle of Dawn a spin. After all, Beau seems to be quite impressed with it.

And then there’s that damn Ryzom I just can’t get out of my head…arrrrrgh. I think I’ll go play inFamous for a bit.

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Eurogamer vs Aventurine – FIGHT!

darkfall-dwarfEurogamer gets Ed Zitron to review Darkfall. Ed scores the game with a 2/10. Aventurine gets angry, claims that Ed only played for 2 hours – most of which he spent in the character creation screen. They got the logs to prove it, states that as “just the facts“. Blogosphere goes a bit crazy over it, jumps on Eurogamer and claims that their reputation has been damaged. Stropp even compares it to Gerstmanngate. Darkfall-fans are upset. Ed claims that he played for at least 9 hours and that it seems like Aventurine is missing some logs (update: Tasos replies to that claim).

Now, first of all – 9 hours, even if that’s true, isn’t enough time to review a MMO. But it’s still 5 times the amount of time Aventurine claims he played. In the end, that doesn’t really matter. What does matter is that everyone automatically believes Aventurine. They have been wronged, game journalism is in a bad state, Eurogamer is evil and won’t pull the review. Aventurine is automatically telling the truth.

If you’ve ever been working as a game journalist, you know that most of the low scores you give a game will come under attack. If not from fanboys, then from the game company itself or its PR-people. It’s part of their job. Giving a 2/10 to a game won’t stand undisputed. Why would it? It hurts the company who made the game being reviewed. Of course they’ll fire back in one way or another. In certain cases it’s nothing more than a PR-rep calling up the editor, yelling a bit and then hanging up – end of story, business as usual. In other cases it can lead to incidents like Gerstmanngate.

But do remember that it’s business. Reading Ed’s review I can agree, even if I’ve never played Darkfall, that it seems like he didn’t play nearly enough to get into it. But Aventurine knows it’s a niche title and should be fully prepared to get some low scores. You make a niche title which has a hard learning curve, get ready to take some flack. You make a game with UI-problems and a non-intuitive control scheme (which as far as I’ve understood it, Darkfall does have), get ready for some bad reviews. Sadly, that’s the name of the game. Get a PR-rep to handle the contact with Eurogamer’s editors.

In general, this incident has lessons for all of us – both for journalists and developers. Journalists should be aware that they are being monitored if they are playing on an account supplied by the game company. They should be aware of the problems this might bring if a) they don’t do their job and if b) they give a game a low score, no matter how much time they actually spent in game. Developers might even learn a lesson in how to manipulate the press, if Tortage wasn’t enough already.

In the future, when more and more MMOs flood the market, we’ll need to find a new way and a new format for reviewing MMOs. The old ways won’t work in the long run, something more obvious than ever. But please, don’t judge Eurogamer purely on what Aventurine is telling you. I’m not saying that they are lying, but that it’s part of their job to refute low scoring reviews. Until a neutral third party reveals exactly what happened, don’t jump the gun too quickly.

And Aventurine, where’s the Gamereactor press account for Darkfall? I promise, I’ll give the game more than 9 hours.

Update: Keen writes some good stuff about the whole incident over at his and Graev’s gaming blog, also offering some ideas about how Aventurine could’ve dealt with the review in a better way. I agree, the “you are wrong and we got proof”-tactic doesn’t really help, except making people that already love Darkfall hate Eurogamer a bit more.

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All your quests suck (almost)

questingI just wrote a long version of this entry, it was just too bloody long so I decided to edit it down. Instead of going through Kaplan’s keynote point by point (Scott Jennings did such a great job of that already) or coming up with ways to improve quests by improving the game world (Dusty Monk has done that for me), I’ll just sum up my thoughts on quest design with stating that quests in a MMO suck. They are a cheap way of creating immersion. And very, very frail.

  • Quests are a great way of creating content and control where you want the player to go and what to do. It’s a good way to teach people the game and lead them towards that magic place called ”end game”. But if you don’t have enough quests on the way there, the player will get confused and angry. Here’s looking at you, Age of Conan. Quests might make ”easy” content, but you will also teach players to rely on quests for fun.
  • Quests are very sensitive to changes in the game mechanics, such as changes in the levelling curve. If you don’t change all the content when you start to offer more XP per quest or kill, the whole house of cards will come tumbling down and your game (while perhaps entertaining to a lot of people) will be broken and not working the way you intended from the start.
  • Quests can kill immersion. Quests to kill certain named characters become pointless when that character will respawn a few minutes later. Kill-quests can become annoying if the mob that you are supposed to kill has a really frustrating ability. Collection quests are a huge pain in the behind if they don’t make sense (the good old ”why doesn’t this bear have paws”-problem).
  • There can only be so many quests. Players that play a lot will run out of quests to do. Daily quests are a good cop out, since you can sneak them in as ”real content”, but sooner or later the player will be bored with them as well. Then they will cry for more quests. You have a constant desire for more content to fill, while more and more players become confused and bored.
  • Did I mention that daily quests are a cop out?

If you make a list of problems with quests, you should always have a solution at hand. If you don’t, you’ll get flamed (”rofl, try making a better game yourself, nub”). Luckily I do, a solution that I find quite elegant.

Simply, design your game primarily without quests. Make sure that even if you take away the quests, players have something to do. If you want quests in your game, for story reasons or because you know that’s what some people will expect, do it after you got a solid game without them. That way, if the players do run out of quests, they will still have a lot of stuff to do. If you do break them because you changed the levelling curve, or don’t have enough of them to carry a player from his/her first step in your world to the level cap, you don’t have to worry that much – you can always take your time and fix things for the better without having the community breathing down your neck, jumping ship to find new quest based MMOs to bitch about.

Some people will always complain about a lack of new content, so even if you skip quests completely or do not put much focus on them you will need to add stuff to your MMO continously. Of course, of course. But if you look at games like EVE Online, Ryzom or Darkfall, people are enjoying themselves without having to rely on the developers to constantly feed them new updates. The missions in EVE are mainly a way to make money, the missions in Ryzom are horrible and can be skipped 99.9% of the time (you really only need them to level your fame with various factions, they don’t pay nearly well enough or give XP worth the hassle) and Darkfall was never intended as a questing game – it’s built for players keeping themselves occupied by, well, chopping other players to pieces. Or “interacting”, whatever you want to call it.

Without quests in, for example, World of Warcraft there really isn’t much else to do. Battlegrounds quickly become repetitive or a grind, crafting isn’t immersive enough to stand on its own (EVE, Vanguard and Ryzom really got WoW beat there) and just doing rep grinding over and over isn’t very entertaining for long. Quests used to lead to raids, like the quests from the Hydraxian Waterlords or the Onyxia quest chain in Vanilla or the Vials of Eternity-quest in TBC, but Blizzard decided to not implement any in Wrath of the Lich King. Confusing? Yup.

Build a world first, then spice it up a bit with quests. Don’t rely on the quests to do the immersion work for you.

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PvP, the community and nerd rage

The whole issue of PvP-based MMOs has been a hot topic on MMO-blogs since Darkfall’s release and people have been trying to nitpick and analyze the game’s coming success or downfall on how its community or technology will develop. Over on his blog, Brian Green wrote an interesting article about why PvP-games’ core problem is their community, calling it a deeper problem than “technical instability and insane design decisions”, relating the whole thing to his own experiences with working on Meridian 59. Most importantly, he brings up the paradox that a lot of players of these games will face sooner or later…

The players say want the opportunity to win big, which means they also have to have the chance to lose it all if they are fighting against other players. This ties back into the issue people often mention that players fantasize that they’ll always be on top, winning all the battles and getting all the great rewards. They never want to think about the times when they’re the underdog, coming back naked after being completely looted and having nothing left in the vaults to fall back on. So, it’s not just a matter of making the mistakes less costly.

The article reminded me of what one of my old CEOs in EVE Online once told me – “giving a person in my corp more power is not about giving him or her more responsibility to the group, it is giving him more power the ruin the game for others”. Corp theft is one of the reasons why corps in EVE are generally paranoid, a well-placed spy or a corp member going rogue and emptying the corp hangars or wallets can destroy the most well-structured corporation in a matter of seconds. It’s an integral part of the game, CCP even recognizes corp theft as a valid career in EVE, but people much more prefer to read about the more dramatic instances of hangars being emptied (like the Guiding Hand Social Club-incident) than actually seeing it happen to themselves. They want the game to be free enough to let it happen, yet they never want to see it happen in their own backyards. Players have cancelled their subs in a nerd rage for much less.

But EVE Online and Darkfall are two niche titles, despite both getting a lot of attention in the media and in blogs. Darkfall will probably settle down with a fairly small player base, that will either tear itself apart of start to organize itself in a way similar to how the corporations in EVE have done. EVE Online, even though it is successful and slowly growing, only has around 200k players (and can only accepts so many subs before the galaxy will start to feel too crowded for comfort). But 2008 saw two triple A-MMOs released, two games with a strong PvP-focus and whose communities helped to ruin their potential instant success – Age of Conan and Warhammer Online.

Now, Conan and Warhammer did have their technical problems to begin with and the PvP was hardly completely to blame. Conan did sell very well at launch, boasting somewhere around 700k subs at the end of the first month (which is a huge number), with around 400k sticking around to August 2008. The number of players held by the game right now is up to debate, but figures around 50 – 100k have been mentioned in various places. Warhammer Online on the other hand seems to have around 300k subs according to an economical report from EA. That’s still a lot of people. But the fact remains that the two games, even though they have constantly been improving since day one, don’t have the best of reputation. Age of Conan never managed to get over the initial, and sometimes completely over the top, hatred that a lot of players spewed on it (and Funcom) – a lot of people complaining not only about the lack of end-game content, but also the lack of a proper PvP-system. Warhammer Online has also seen a lot of attacks from players, a lot of it directed towards open world PvP and public quests.

Let’s start out, for the sake of the argument, to leave the PvE behind. The public quests in WAR looked better on paper than they did when the first players had left the starting areas and the lack of end-game content in AoC in more or less irrelevant to a discussion about PvP. Looking at only the PvP in those two games, they suffer/suffered from the lack of open world PvP in WAR and the lack of a proper PvP-system in AoC (as mentioned above). And when it all comes down to it, these two problems have one thing in common – the community and its craving for rewards…

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Interested in Darkfall?

MMOcrunch has published a pretty long and interesting write up of the Darkfall Beta. It more or less cemented my opinion that it’s a niche title that won’t get much attention once the dust and hype settles, except for the kind of guild-related drama that a title like this is bound to attract. I doubt I will enjoy playing it but I am really excited over reading future articles about the madness that will ensue once the really hardcore PvP-crowd starts to gather…EVE Online, move over, there might be a new drama bomb in town.

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Virtual worlds, massive multiplayer games and assorted ramblings

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